1G$* Im working here in canada as a caregiver. I am a Registered Nurse in the Philippines

I am Working here In Canada as a Caregiver. I am a Registered Nurse in the PhilippinesHi! Im working here in canada as a caregiver. Im interested to apply to be LPN and RN here… I dont know if my credentials will be qualify… I have two courses in the Philippines, one Is Business Management graduated then i continue it in field of Nursing,i graduated again last october , I am a Registered Nurse in the Philippines, since February. Can i ask if u allow a voluntary works as NNAS job experience in health care as an evidence for safe nursing?what are the guidelines to assess my credentials here? Fees?Ielts? thank u.Hope u can help me..im bit confuse…God bless!!! M


Dear M,

Thank you for your email. It is a very confusing process, so I am glad that you have asked so many questions. Please continue to read posts on Dear Kim to gleen information from the questions other IENs have asked me. There are more than 500 posts for you to read and learn from!

Being a Temporary Foreign Worker as a Live In Care Giver your status is different from most of the people who write to me; they are usually PR’s (Permanent Residents) but I can assure you that even as a TFW and 

CELBAN Preparation in the PhilippinesLICG you can begin your licensure process to become an LPN or RN here in Canada!

You do not have to wait until you have your PR.

I know many LICG’s who have passed the CELBAN and the LPN exam and who have recently become LPNs at the same time they became PRs, having come to Canada as TFW with the LICG program.

Whether you choose to become an LPN or RN or both is up to you:

But there are differences:

  • The process to become an LPN takes less time, and is less expensive.
  • The process to become an RN takes longer, and is more expensive.

Many IENs choose to do both paths at the same time. Those who do so have a higher degree of hope and motivation as a result of working as an healthcare professional and obtaining greater financial freedom. The costs of becoming an RN are mitigated by the wages of an LPN. Meaning, by making more money as a licenced professional, you can save up for the RN process.

The role of the NNAS is to determine your qualifications. They will create a report, based on your education and experience, and send it to the provincial college of nursing of your choice, whether it is for a college of LPNs or RNs or both. There is a fee for the report to be sent to each regulatory body. You will find all this information on the NNAS website.

Once you have provided your documentation and English results to NNAS and a report has been written and received by the provincial college of your choice, that regulatory body will determine your next step, what courses are required, if you need a refresher, jurisprudence exams, and determine your safe practice timelines. After all academic equivalencies are completed, it is the provincial college that issues a temporary license (LPN) or graduate license (RN) to acquire the required hours of nursing in Canada. IENs on the path of becoming an RN practice as Graduate Nurses while preparing for the national board exam.

Back in 2014, I wrote several posts for Dear Kim about the licensure process and NNAS. Please review each of them to fully understand the steps and requirements. While you may be reading about a process that is different from the process in your province, you will have a better understanding of the system and process as a whole.

Another important question to consider, then, is:

In short, because:

  1. your file is only open for one year, and you must pay for an extension,
  2. you will be required to provide the required score for an English Proficiency Exam,

…begin your application process with NNAS when you have obtained the required score. It is highly advisable to attempt the iCELBAN as a Readiness Self Assessment and get unofficial results before you take the Official CELBAN and get official results sent to NNAS. 

I hope that I have been able to answer some of your questions and you have some direction:

  • information about the licensure process on Dear Kim,
  • information about fees, CELBAN and IELTS scores from NNAS, and a
  • warning to avoid the the CELBAN Trap.

Once you have waded through all this information, please write back. I consider this an ongoing dialogue. I am here to assist you in navigating your professional course before you.

Sincerely,

Kim

2 responses to “1G$* Im working here in canada as a caregiver. I am a Registered Nurse in the Philippines

  1. Milen Lourie P. De Guzman

    Dear Kim,

    Hi! I’m a PR here in Canada for 1 year now and i am currently working as care manager. I’m a RN in the Philippines and I am planning to take my Celban test this year. How long will a have to review with your help to pass my first attempt in Celban? Thank you!

    Mrs. D

    • Mrs. D,
      Welcome! Thank you for your message, and congratulations on obtaining your PR and employment as a Care Manager!

      The goal of taking your exam this year is a good one. This gives you lots of time to prepare.

      How much time it takes to prepare depends on the person: your skills, abilities and competencies now and how much time you have to prepare.

      People who have a 5 in IELTS take 6 months to a year. Those who have lots of time take 6 months. Those who do not have a lot of time to prepare take a year or more.

      People who have a 7 in IELTS take 3-6 months. Those who have lots of time take 3 months. Those who do not have a lot of time to prepare take 6 months.
      Those who are registered as LPNs or have completed jurisprudence and have passed the CRNE, being registered with the CNO, are able to prepare for the CELBAN in 2 months.

      At the end of the day I am proud of your question, “How long will a have to review with your help to pass my first attempt in Celban?” It is this question that allows you to protect yourself from falling into the CELBAN Trap. (https://myiepc.ca/The-CELBAN-Trap-ebook).

      All the best,
      Kim

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